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Thursday, May 29, 2008

Life is So Good

Author: George Dawson and Richard Glaubman
Rating: 5/5
Reason for Reading: In Their Shoes Reading Challenge

Cross-posted at In Their Shoes Blog

I won this book because of My Year of Reading Dangerously Challenge (Yay!). The cover and title don't make it sound like an exciting read, but in reality, this was a fascinating, sometimes gripping read. George Dawson, the grandson of slaves, lived to be 103. The reason he became well-known (and thus this book was written) is because at the age of 98, he made the decision to learn how to read, a skill that had been denied him as a poor black man in the early 1900's.

In this memoir, George writes about growing up in the segregated south. As a young child, he witnessed a lynching of a man he knew to be innocent. While trying to process the horrifying experience, he has an exchange with his father:

"I will never work for or talk to a white person again," I said with anger.... Papa swallowed hard and pulled up on the reins so that the wagon stopped. He turned towards me. "No. You will work for white folks. You will talk to them... Some of those white folks was mean and nasty. Some were just scared. It doesn't matter. You have no right to judge another human being. Don't you ever forget." My father had spoken. There was nothing to say. I didn't know it then, but his words set the direction my life would take even to this day.

George had a good many adventures during his life, from playing on the Negro Leagues to riding the rails all the way from Mexico to Canada and everywhere in between. He recounts his experiences during The Great Depression, the Civil Rights movement and other turning points of the past century.

I could outline all of the events of the book, and really it wouldn't capture what the book is exactly about. Yes, the book brings the reader through the dirty underside of racism, but that isn't what the book is about either. He experienced many of the things most of us only know from history books, and it included a great deal of hardship. I guess you could say that this book is an attempt to tell his story, and recount how he managed to maintain his dignity and optimism through all of it.

George Dawson is a truly remarkable man. After joining an Adult Education class, he stayed with it until he had earned a GED. He seems a bit incredulous that so many people are fascinated and inspired by him, but glad to talk to people and help them all the same. You'll be glad you read this book.

8 comments:

Debi said...

Oh Kim, this does sound wonderful! Thanks for the review!

Nymeth said...

wow, this sounds absolutely fascinating! One more for the wishlist.

Andi said...

YAY! I'm SO glad you liked this one! Guess I should get my copy down and read it too, huh? :) This is one of Heather's faves.

Kim L said...

debi-glad you liked it!

nymeth-it definitely is fascinating!

andi-yes, and thank you both for it! I loved it. And you definitely should read it:-)

Trish said...

What a fascinating and inspiring story! Thanks for sharing--I hadn't heard of this one.

Kim L said...

trish-its definitely worth your time! Hope you like it.

Becca said...

Wow, I'm glad I stopped and read this review. You're right, the title and cover aren't very compelling, but the story behind it sounds great. I've added it to my ever-growing list. Thanks!

Kim L said...

Becca, I do hope you get the chance to read this book because it is really good!